person running on dirt road
Anxiety, Christian Living, Depression, Encouragement, Intentional, Mental Health

Ditch the ‘just’

person running on dirt road

For the last 10 years I have been training for and running half marathons. My husband and I always do a specific one every October, going back to the city where we first lived as newlyweds. I pretty much run 3 days a week year round.

Despite all that, I have a hard time calling myself a runner.

Since elementary I have loved to write. I would always get excited for any writing assignment that was given. While the rest of the class groaned, I grinned. As an adult, I have been writing on a blog for over a decade and even self-published an Advent devotional a couple years ago.

Despite all that, I have a hard time calling myself a writer.

Because I’m not the fastest, haven’t taken home any awards, and don’t really have a runner’s physique, I disqualify myself from the “runner” category. Because a large publishing house hasn’t taken an interest in my book, I lack confidence that my writing is good. It feels too self-serving to call myself a writer so I disqualify myself from that category as well.

And I’m not alone in this. We play the downgrade game all the time. If someone is doing it better, more efficiently, more profoundly, and being recognized for it, then we feel that we have lost the chance to take the title for ourselves as well. We often downplay it by putting the word “just” in front of it. Just part-time. Just a stay at home mom. Just a small business. Just a hobby.

We play the downgrade game all the time. If someone is doing it better, more efficiently, more profoundly, and being recognized for it, then we feel that we have lost the chance to take the title for ourselves as well. We often… Click To Tweet

Aren’t we thankful that God doesn’t do this to us?

When we come to Him with a repentant heart, desiring a change, and seeking Christ’s blood for our atonement, then we find mercy, forgiveness, and love. We become a child of God. Even when we stumble, lose trust, forget who is in charge, and do a poor job of representing Jesus, we are still a child of God. Even if someone is doing it better than us, yet we still remain His.

What word are you putting just in front of? Why do you downplay that in your life? Is this thing a gift that God has given you? Is this a way that you can glorify God?

Colossians 3:17 ESV says,”And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.”


woman wearing white top

“And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.”

— Colossians 3:17 ESV

Whether you work part-time, are a stay-at-home mom, run a small business, run races, or write blog posts. Each one is something that can bring glory to God. 

Satan wants to convince us that whatever work, hobby, or career we do is too little to matter for anyone. He wants to keep us thinking that we are insignificant to the Kingdom. He likes to keep putting that ‘just’ in front of things.

Satan wants to convince us that whatever work, hobby, or career we do is too little to matter for anyone. He wants to keep us thinking that we are insignificant to the Kingdom. He likes to keep putting that ‘just’ in front of things. Click To Tweet

Because when we continue to think that our lives are not helpful to others and aren’t significant to God, then we downplay it and keep the talents that God has given us hidden.

people walking

Paul encourages fellow believers in Corinth with these words, “Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain.” I Corinthians 15:58 ESV

When the actions of our daily lives are for God’s glory and not our own, the ‘just’ part of the title is stripped away. Anything done for the Lord is never in vain. The world may not recognize it, but God does. You are a child of God. And there is no ‘just’ in front of that.

three people donating goods
Anxiety, Christian Living, Encouragement, Health, Love Your Neighbor, Mental Health, Relationships

When service has left you empty

The word “serve” can evoke many types of emotions – good and bad.

If I am at a restaurant: I am glad for that waiter who serves.  And I expect good service.

man and woman wearing black and white striped aprons cooking

But if I am doing the third load of laundry of the day and one of my children walks in with mud from toe to teeth – I then serve my family with clean laundry. Oddly enough, that type of service can sometimes rub the wrong way.

We can often find ourselves struggling with the day to day and trying to find joy in the work of the mundane. We often feel unseen. We know we are needed, because often some things don’t get done until we do them. But we wonder if anyone would miss us if we were gone, or they would just wonder where their clean clothes went to. Often those mundane task are also necessary. We are performing a service that is needed and maybe even appreciated, though never put into words.

photo of woman standing inside the laundromat

In Ann Voskamp’s book, One Thousand Gifts, she touches on a similar feeling:

Whenever man is made the center of things he becomes the storm-center of trouble.  The moment you think of serving people, you begin to have a notion that other people owe you something for your pains…You begin to bargain for reward, to angle for applause…When the laundry is for the dozen arms of children or the dozen legs, it’s true, I think I am due some appreciation. So comes a storm of trouble and lightning strikes joy.  But when Christ is at the center, when dishes, laundry, work, is my song of thanks for Him, joy rains.  Passionately serving Christ alone makes us the loving servant to all…the work becomes worship, a liturgy of thankfulness.

Ephesians 5:1-2 (The Message) gives us more:

Watch what God does, and then you do it, like children who learn proper behavior from their parents. Mostly what God does is love you. Keep company with him and learn a life of love. Observe how Christ loved us. His love was not cautious but extravagant. He didn’t love in order to get something from us but to give everything of himself to us. Love like that.

This is part of our problem – we are looking for something in return.

Life as a Christ-follower is servant focused. If we are walking as Jesus did we will serve and love, not in order to receive, but to give. Our days will be filled with service in one form or another. And we won’t necessarily get something in return for the work that we do.

Life as a Christ-follower is servant focused. If we are walking as Jesus did we will serve and love, not in order to receive, but to give. Click To Tweet

Sometimes we may even yearn for a simple thank you, but those may be lacking, as well.

But Jesus served.  He loved.  And he didn’t look for anything in return.

I’m reminded of the story in Luke 17 where he healed 10 lepers.

Ten mean were healed … and only one came back to thank him.  It makes one pause to consider how often thank yous were actually said to Jesus.

a man greeting an elderly woman

But as the verse in Ephesians says, love by giving everything.  When we envision a life of serving and giving without expectation, then we will be to a point that at the end of the day we will be empty.

Emptied – so that He can fill us back up.

When we give of ourselves completely, everyday, our life may look like this at the end of the day:

  • worn out body
  • messy living room
  • laundry still needing to be folded
  • dirty dishes stacked by the sink

Your first thought may be that nothing was actually completed. But look at what was accomplished:

  • quality conversations made with the 13-year-old
  • snuggle on the couch with the 3-year-old
  • meaningful time with the husband
  • heart warmed from relationships built just a bit stronger

The world tells us to look out for, and save time for, ourselves. That is a valid point. We can’t serve if we are worn out, empty, and unhealthy.

But to be filled up, our “me time” needs to be more “God time” – time we spend with Him to fill us up when our tank is running on empty. God is the owner of unlimited resources, He has the power to give you the stamina you need to live out the calling He has led you to. When we pull our energy from the true source, instead of what the world tells us we need, we can find the stamina we didn’t think we had.

back view of a person walking on a forest path

When we take this perspective on service and how we use our time, it can soften our hearts towards those we are asked to serve. When some one disrupts our plans, throws off our schedule, or makes us have to redo what we just completed, we can remind ourselves that Jesus’s love was not cautious but extravagant. He didn’t love in order to get something from us but to give everything of himself to us. We can love like that.

Because when we serve others we are ultimately serving God and not man – when we are serving without looking for anything in return.

And that kind of service can make all the difference.

Looking for a short devotional that will help center your heart on the true reason for the season?

Purchase the digital download of Prepare Him Room: an Intentional Advent devotional and also receive the free devotional Intentional Heart.

people walking on spacious concrete square
Anxiety, Christian Living, Encouragement, Intentional, Rest

Rest from the endless-effort life

We buy into the lie that we are only worth what we produce.

Without even realizing it, we live this out in our day to day existence.

We create, we produce, we make more. We share it with the world and then wait with expectation, hoping for acknowledgment, desiring someone to tell us they like what we do. Because if someone likes our work, then we matter.

Then we project that same thought process on our relationship with God, telling ourselves that each thing we do will make us better in His sight.

woman sitting in front of macbook
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We keep striving, doing more, producing more – believing it will fulfill us and define our worth.

But instead of fulfillment, we are exhausted. Instead of worthy, we continue to feel like we fall short.

We’ve taken the lie that we are only worth what we produce and have made it our mantra. And it has left us tired and weary.

How do we fight back? What is the cure for the endless-effort life?

turned off laptop computer
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Do the opposite.

Whenever you feel the need rising up in you to have to prove your worth, or the voice in your head starts telling you that if you aren’t moving ahead then you’re falling behind – then fight the urge and do the opposite.

Do nothing. Rest. Set your work on the shelf. Do something that no one else can acknowledge or see or know. Take a nap. Journal. Go for a walk. Bake muffins and then sit on your porch and eat one warm.

Hebrews 4:9+10 (ESV) is a beautiful invitation to cease from the endless-effort life: So then, there remains a Sabbath rest for the people of God. For the one who has entered His rest has himself also rested from his works, as God did from His.

Fight against the endless-effort life —> Whenever you feel the need rising up in you to have to prove your worth, or the voice in your head starts telling you that if you aren’t moving ahead then you’re falling behind – then fight… Click To Tweet
people walking on spacious concrete square
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When we seek Christ as our Savior, then we can cease from the endless-effort life. We have nothing to prove and no worth to claim. Christ has sacrificed his life for ours and in Him we have our purpose and our worth.

Any work we do and any thing we create are just embellishments. They aren’t needed, but they are welcomed. They are beautiful works that can point back to Jesus.

We are invited into this Sabbath rest, not just on Sundays, but every day. We are invited to rest from our striving in life and instead rest and trust in God to give us our worth and fulfillment.

What part of your endless-effort life can you set aside for a life of Sabbath rest?

Fight against the endless-effort life —> When we seek Christ as our Savior, then we can cease from the endless-effort life. We have nothing to prove and no worth to claim. Christ has sacrificed his life for ours and in Him we have… Click To Tweet

Are you also tired of the endless-effort life? Click for your free download – a guide to Quitting the Endless-Effort Life.

group of people making toast
Anxiety, Depression, Encouragement, Intentional, Love Your Neighbor, Relationships

3 time-wasting busters

We all like the idea that our time is not wasted, yet how often do we fall into the time warp of distractions: social media, emails, procrastination, streaming videos, and lack of priorities. We know these things can suck up our time, but yet we fall into their traps time and time again. How can we break free? 

With small, intentional moments.

Of the myriad of things we do each day, we want something to count– not just in a quantifiable way, but in a soul-filling, joy-inducing way.

God’s word calls us to be purposeful with our time, even calling us to “redeem” it. To redeem something means that you buy it back. But, how can you take back something that is fleeting and slipping away constantly?

We have an Enemy that wants to distract us, to keep us from our mission of spreading the Gospel and God’s love. Every moment spent distracted from that work is a moment that he has won. So, to redeem the moments we are in right now, we can intentionally take it from the enemy that wants to distract us, and focus these moment on lasting things. We can take a temporal moment and use it to fulfill something on an eternal timeline.

Sounds great, but how?

Be aware that you are an ambassador
Colossians 4:5-6
Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person.
Even when you don’t think anyone is watching, someone is. It may only be one person, but to that person you may be the hope and encouragement they need to desire to seek a joy-filled life like yours. Keep your words kind and be ready to give an answer for the hope that is in you.

group of people making toast
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Encourage others with God’s Word
Ephesians 5:19
…Addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ…
The world is full enough of discouragement, be the one to encourage. Find ways to spread the hope of Jesus to your fellow brothers and sisters. Be willing to take the time to listen to another’s hurts, be willing to pray, and to point them back to the hope of Jesus.

crop psychologist supporting patient during counseling indoors
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Look for ways to do good
Titus 3:8-9
The saying is trustworthy, and I want you to insist on these things, so that those who have believed in God may be careful to devote themselves to good works. These things are excellent and profitable for people. But avoid foolish controversies, genealogies, dissensions, and quarrels about the law, for they are unprofitable and worthless. 
There is always an opportunity to do good. Prayer, generosity, showing grace, choosing selflessness – these are all excellent and profitable. Choosing to step away from discussions that you know will go nowhere, choosing instead to have those intimate chats with a person’s heart can move more obstacles than a rant on a social feed.

man couple love people
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Your turn. How are ways you can redeem your time this week? Where can you take back the time that the Enemy distracts and use it for furthering God’s Kingdom work? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

photo of vegetable salad in bowls
Anxiety, Encouragement, Intentional, Money

Is it time to address that grocery budget?

A 2-step plan to tackle anxiety

A few years ago, ‘the grocery store,’ would not have been a place that I would have named as one that caused me anxiety.

At one point in time, in order to save-more-to-give-more, we kept ourselves at a weekly grocery budget of $50 – for a family of 5. We had to get pretty creative, but there was always enough food to eat. And trying to make it all work out was more of a fun game than stressful.

assorted vegetable lot
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But the conditions of the last few years has made that $50 goal a distant memory. For one, our 3 children are no longer elementary kids with sizable appetites, they are 3 teenagers with bottomless pits. And I don’t have to tell you about the rising food prices.

Lately, as I walk the aisles of the store, I can feel the anxiety creep in. Between an entire type of food no longer being available (yogurt?!) or some things causing twice as much as they used to (potatoes?!) I start to feel the cloud of doom and gloom and wonder how we’re going to make this all work.


One morning in the grocery store, as my panic started to rise, I stood still in the cereal aisle. My heart and mind needed a reboot. So, I stood there and prayed silently to God. Asking Him to calm my anxious heart and to also remind me that He is the provider of all things – back when we paid $50 and even now when we have to pick and choose what to get to make it all fit in the budget.

I have found, when it comes to anxiety, that being still and being active go hand in hand. First, we need to make ourselves ‘be still’ because it’s the exact opposite of what our body feels like it should do. But being still and remembering our God is in control is paramount. Once we have centered our mind on this thought, then we can move forward with the doing, the ‘being active.’

The same is the case when it comes to our money. Maybe you, too, feel the anxiety when it comes to your money and the food budget. When I feel the anxiety rising, I tackle it with the “be still and be active” approach.

fruits on glass top display counter
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  1. Be still. Remind yourself that God is the provider. There is an old hymn we sing at church, some of the lines include, “This one thing assures us, whatever betide, the heart cheering promise, the Lord will provide.” Whether it’s scripture or song lyrics, have a line that you can repeat to yourself when you start to feel anxious about the grocery budget. Force yourself to be still, remember the promise that God will provide, and thank Him for the provision He has already provided.
  2. Be active. Make a menu. This one is actually hard for me. I would prefer to just cook off what I feel for that day. But, to really stick with a budget and not over-buy, creating a weekly dinner menu is crucial. Often I have themes for different days of the week to help me when I’m not feel creative (which is more often than not!) Meatless Monday, Sandwich Wednesday, and Noodle Thursday are just a few.
  3. Be active. Stick to the plan. No matter how great the deal is, if it’s not on your list, don’t get it. If you feel like you absolutely have to, then swap out for something else on the list.
  4. Be active. Go meatless. No, you don’t need to be a vegetarian! But, one night a week, cook with beans or some other protein instead. Just one night a week will help whittle the expenses down. When you do cook with meat, cut the amount in half. Throw half the sausage in your marinara and put the other half in the freezer for the next week. You’ll still get the flavor and help stretch the food further.
  5. Be still. Respond in gratitude. Once the groceries are loaded, before you even turn on your car, be still and thank God. Every good and perfect gift comes down from the Father (James 1:17), including the milk and eggs. Stop and respond in gratitude, acknowledging your Provider and rejoicing in His goodness.

Your turn! I’d love to hear your tricks and tips for helping your food costs go further. How do you handle the anxiety that comes with budgeting?